Wednesday, December 9, 2009
GINA prohibits employers, employment agencies, and unions from discriminating against an individual based on the person's genetic information.
Wednesday, December 9, 2009
Dallas Employment Lawyer Keith Clouse Reports a Texas appellate court held that the City of San Antonio did not discriminate against a male employee.
Monday, November 30, 2009
Now is the time to eat, drink and be merry. But, office holiday parties can create dilemmas for employers. Dallas employment lawyer Keith Clouse explains why.
Monday, November 30, 2009
Dallas Employment Lawyer Keith Clouse discusses how the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals recently reversed summary judgment in a Section 1981 race discrimination matter.
Wednesday, November 18, 2009
If an employer seeks a waiver of a possible age claim, the employer must comply with the specific requirements for waivers of claims arising under the federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act.
Wednesday, November 18, 2009
A retaliation claim often turns on circumstantial proof.
Monday, November 9, 2009
Although settlement terms are not usually disclosed, according to Dallas employment lawyer Keith Clouse, many lawsuits brought to enforce covenants not to compete settle shortly after being filed.
Monday, November 9, 2009
Dallas employment lawyer, Keith Clouse explains the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals recently upheld summary judgment for an employer in a hostile work environment and retaliation case.
Tuesday, November 3, 2009
Just as with a written contract, a party can sue to collect damages for the other party's breach of an oral agreement.
Tuesday, November 3, 2009
The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals recently upheld summary judgment for an employer in a same-sex sexual harassment and retaliation matter.
Tuesday, October 27, 2009
While cell phones increase employee accessibility, studies consistently show that driving while texting or talking on a cell phone leads to increased accidents.
Tuesday, October 27, 2009
Unfortunately, not all employment relationships end well; some end up at the courthouse. Dallas employment lawyer Keith Clouse explains what happens next.