×
Thursday, July 29, 2021

How Military Service Can Align with a Cybersecurity Career

Last updated Friday, June 25, 2021 23:51 ET , Source: Global Tech Council

Global Tech Council is a platform bringing techies from all around the globe to share their knowledge, passion, expertise, and vision on various in-demand technologies.

Menlo Park, CA, United States, 06/25/2021 / SubmitMyPR /

The cybersecurity sector continues to struggle with a global skills deficit. Even though the deficit has shrunk from 4 million to 3.1 million since last year, the 2020 (ISC)2 Cybersecurity Workforce Study revealed that more than half of IT and security professionals (56 percent) believe cybersecurity personnel shortages are putting their businesses at risk. This gap arises for a variety of reasons, including the challenge of attracting diverse talent to the field of cybersecurity.

Individuals who may not have traditional IT credentials or follow the usual career path that a business seeks might be recruited into the cybersecurity field. And one such

What is Network Security?

The phrase "network security" refers to a wide range of technology, equipment, and procedures. In its most basic form, it is a collection of rules and settings that use both software and hardware technologies to secure the integrity, confidentiality, and accessibility of computer networks and data. Every company, regardless of size, sector, or infrastructure, needs network security solutions to defend itself from the ever-increasing panorama of cyber threats that exist today.

Today, there's a high demand for Certified Network Security Engineer to take care of the complicated networks. Becoming a cybersecurity engineer with network security certifications will surely put you a notch high in the job market.

Today's network architecture is complicated, and it must contend with a constantly evolving threat environment and attackers who are always looking for and exploiting weaknesses. These flaws may be found in a variety of places, including devices, data, apps, users, and geographic locations. As a result, various network security management tools, network security professionals, and apps are currently in use to address specific threats and exploits, as well as regulatory non-compliance. When even a few minutes of the outage may cause widespread inconvenience and significant harm to a company's financial line and reputation, these safeguards must be in place.

How does network security work?

When it comes to network security in a business, there are several layers to consider. Attacks can occur at any tier of the network security layers model; thus, your network security hardware, software, and rules must be built to cover all of them.

Physical, technical, and administrative controls are the most common types of network security measures. The many forms of network security and how each control works are described briefly below.

Physical Network Security

Unauthorized personnel getting physical access to network components such as routers, cabling closets, and so on is prevented by physical security mechanisms. In every company, controlled access, such as locks, biometric authentication, and other devices, is critical.

Technical Network Security

Data that is stored on the network or that is in transit across, into, or out of the network is protected by technical security mechanisms. It is necessary to secure data and systems from unauthorized persons as well as harmful acts by workers.

The Opportunity and the Gap

The cybersecurity sector necessitates a unique set of abilities that go beyond the standard networking and programming skills required in other IT areas. One of the most significant difficulties is the scarcity of resources available to provide individuals with the hands-on training required for network security engineer certifications. Colleges and colleges are trying their best, but owing to the rapid rate of technological development, book knowledge frequently lacks practical application and can rapidly become obsolete. As a result, people ranging from university students to computer engineers to veterans moving back into civilian life are more likely to choose alternative employment choices.

The pool of possible applicants available to fill important roles within IT teams is limited as a result of this lack of assistance. The ensuing skills gap makes it difficult to hire skilled cybersecurity specialists, adding to an already long list of worries about assuring end-to-end security and business continuity.

This difficulty, however, has a silver lining for job searchers, particularly those aforementioned veterans moving back into civilian life. Veterans have shown to be particularly well-suited to several elements of cybersecurity. Yet, when it comes to hiring, veterans are frequently ignored.

An Opportunity for the Veteran

According to the Department of Defense, over 200,000 military people move to civilian life in the United States each year. These veterans have an average of 15 years of training and experience when they enter the civilian market. As a result, many of them are migrating with unique skill sets that make them excellent prospects for cybersecurity employment.

And if you're a veteran reading this, you're probably well aware of how difficult it can be to obtain civilian work. Part of the issue might be that veterans are unaware of how their military training can be applied to civilian jobs. Your military experience, which frequently includes dealing with high-tech gear, has given you characteristics like situational awareness, a chain of command comprehension, and the capacity to operate under extreme pressure. All of these characteristics are advantageous to a job in cybersecurity.

Additionally, veterans have received training in collaboration, leadership, service, and getting the job done regardless of the circumstances. They usually have an operations-oriented attitude, which is extremely useful and essential in any cybersecurity team, bringing value. As an extra benefit, some of these employees have security clearances, which are not only costly to get and maintain for private businesses but also take up to 18 months to obtain.

What Can Organizations Do?

Employers face a significant cybersecurity skills shortage, but there are also a wealth of untapped resources. Indeed, organizations are working hard to create and promote innovative veterans' programs aimed at assisting military veterans in making a move into the cybersecurity business.

Programs like this may benefit veterans and bridge the skills gap by providing hands-on training, mentorship, professional networking opportunities, and direct links to an ecosystem of partner companies.

Wrapping up

When all other options have failed, it's time to try something fresh. Due to demand and a lack of appropriate hands-on training, traditional applicant pools in the cybersecurity area are drying up. Despite progress in closing the cybersecurity skills gap, demand continues to rise. Organizations and their data are at higher danger due to a lack of trained people.

That's why it's time to go beyond the box, so to speak, and consider veterans as a possible source of qualified applicants. Each year, tens of thousands of veterans transition to civilian life, bringing with them an operational mindset and a variety of characteristics that make them an excellent fit for the cybersecurity sector. Companies can create their own mentorship program or collaborate with groups that already have one in place to guarantee that veterans receive the necessary training and networking opportunities for a successful cybersecurity career.

Original Source of the original story >> How Military Service Can Align with a Cybersecurity Career


Content Disclaimer:

DISCLAIMER of Liability. IN NO EVENT SHALL OUR PR COMPANY BE LIABLE OR RESPONSIBLE TO YOU OR ANY OTHER PERSON FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, SPECIAL, OR EXEMPLARY DAMAGES OF ANY KIND, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, LOST PROFITS OR LOST OPPORTUNITIES, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES IN ADVANCE AND REGARDLESS OF THE CAUSE OF ACTION UPON WHICH ANY SUCH CLAIM IS BASED, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY CLAIM ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH ANY OF THE CONTENT, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, AUDIO, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND VIDEOS, OR OF THE ACCURACY, RELIABILITY, OR LEGALITY OF ANY STATEMENT MADE IN OR OMITTED FROM ANY advertisement, sponsorship, endorsement, testimonial, opinion, or other product-related or service-related statement or review appearing in the Websites or in ANY post or article distributed via the Websites.